Art Quote of the Day

Friday, November 03, 2017

We Broke Down ArtReview’s Power 100 by Race, Gender, Profession, and Place of Birth

"Power means different things to different people, and takes different forms in different places. The list changes very slowly over time. Still, it serves as an invaluable benchmark of who art world experts think are powerful. We broke down the numbers by race, gender, place of birth, and occupation, and compared this year's list not just to last year's list, but to the first-ever edition from 2002."
https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-broke-artreviews-power-100-race-gender-profession-place-birth

Thursday, November 02, 2017

Art in the age of Trump: An escape, or a place to confront?

"We tend to think of art that has no overt social or political statement as a respite from a worrisome world — worry about racism, terrorism, social justice, inequality, equal rights and protection for women, incivility, and the apparent erosion of the rule of law. A year into the Trump era, the sanity-saving response is quite reasonably: Mozart, take me away."


http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/arts/art-in-the-age-of-trump-an-escape-or-a-place-to-confront-20171102.html

Monday, October 16, 2017

Ruth Asawa Reshapes Art History


"The addition of Asawa to art's overwhelmingly white-male hit parade comes at a critical time in our country, as the policies of the current Administration challenge the undeniable fact that the United States is a nation of immigrants. Asawa's parents were farmers, who emigrated to rural California from Japan. ('Sculpture is like farming,' the artist once said. 'If you just keep at it, you can get quite a lot done.')"


https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/10/09/ruth-asawa-reshapes-art-history
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